How to Choose High-Yield Keywords For Software & Technology Company Lead Generation

Posted on September 1, 2017 in Uncategorized

Many software companies today are not employing best practices regarding SEO, and in my opinion, are leaving some of the most qualified and cost effective leads on the table. There are obviously many facets to SEO; I would like to cover a topic/tactic known as Keyword Selection which I have deployed successfully at two software companies. The result was that each company saw organic search traffic grow more than 45% in a short period of time, and have seen conversion rates in excess of almost 6% on that traffic (conversions in both cases meant registering for a trial product).

Companies tend to gloss over keyword selection with an, “I know the keywords for my business. I don’t need to spend a lot of time on this.”An extensive and thoroughly researched keyword list will result in Google indexing more of your keywords, better search page results, and increased traffic to your website, and should be the foundational basis for a cohesive SEO strategy. For software companies that sell technical products such as developer tools, infrastructure software, and virtualization tools, keyword selection can be of paramount importance to a productive SEO strategy.

Here are a few essential questions and thoughts to consider during the keyword selection process:

1) Are you putting yourself in the shoes of your potential customer and the search terms they, not you, would use when searching for the goods or service you provide? You might call what your product does “Business Transaction Management,” but does your potential clients refer to it by the same name? Is that the term your users are searching on, or one that Gartner is looking to propagate?

2) Technical users frequently search on technical phrases such as error messages and terms that contain how-to and download. They also search for very specific issues, i.e., “VMware IO Problems.” To increase traffic you need to create optimized pages on your website for error messages and specific deep-dive problems your product solves.

3) Use the Google Keyword Tool and Google’s “searches related to” suggestions on the bottom of most search pages to research keywords. Google’s Keyword Tool enables you to view search volumes and competition for terms, and will help you discover research and select deep-dive search terms.

4) Dig deep & assess your competition. Get creative and think beyond the obvious broad keywords. Targeted keywords lead to more qualified prospects, and pick keywords where you can win. If IBM and HP dominate a certain keyword, you likely can not win, so think about derivatives of the broader terms that the behemoths go after.

Research your keywords before doing your on-page optimization. The results will be increased traffic and better qualified leads for your sales force!

Case Study

I did work for an Open Source Java Tools vendor whose target audience was Java developers. At first they had tried optimizing their site for the broad terms that generated massive search volumes such as Java, Java Development Tools, and Open Source Java. They quickly realized that they could not win (a win being on the first page of the Google search results) against the likes of IBM, Sun and HP, whose has deep content, well-established websites, and massive inbound links, which all were unbeatable. Deeper research and analysis illuminated three revelations:

· The broad search terms were attracting junior developers, who were looking to download free tools, get basic how-to information, or the newest version of Java.

· Senior developers searched for very specific phrases, such as actual error messages and detailed descriptions of the issues they were experiencing.

· We noticed that these error messages had commonalities and the web pages that we created were specifically optimized for these error messages and very specific problem descriptions. These new pages quickly made the first search engine results page, generating excellent traffic that was extremely qualified and converted at a very high rate.

Research your keywords before doing your on-page optimization. The results will be increased traffic and better qualified leads for your sales force!

CRM Software – Technology and Strategy Plus

Posted on August 30, 2017 in Uncategorized

Don’t take an entire day managing bulk accounts. Instead, go out or take the web route to sell and pursue promising leads that spell revenues. Meet customers’ needs with effective strategies and cash in on the customers’ buying cycles ahead of competition – with a little help from power-packed CRM software.

The Technology

If you’re managing a Customer Relationship Service, or CRS, you know that the job is not simply entering customers’ information – names, phone numbers, and email addresses. The data you are collecting and storing have to be managed to give meaningful information when you go for an advertising blitz or cooking up more ways to serve up better products and customer service.

Surely you’ve heard the latest buzz in the business grapevine – CRM software. So better take a moment and find out what’s going on. Big and small businesses are using software solutions to handle CRM information to feed company planning for better inter-office teamwork, better customer relationship, and sales. Organizations want to be a step ahead of competition to survive, cut costs, and keep customers.

Forget about the one-way communication lines and the old data banking system that could not track the buying pattern of clients. Remember the unsynchronized activities of the in-house customer service, sales, and marketing? All these are outdated with the CRM software. The existing CRS will see better coordination between these different units in the company.

If you are deciding to take customer relationship a notch higher, start evaluating what you need for your software solutions. Do you want a chat feature to talk to clients/customers? Do you want an index of commercial establishments? Are you handling massive accounts in the hundreds of thousands? Do you constantly need accurate data for analysis? It can take on these issues.

The Options

Since there is a range of options, you will have to consider several of these. You won’t need software that’s effective for a guitar or hat shop. If you are in manufacturing, you need features to synchronize with your existing platform. Perhaps you would like to have an information data network that can help track the previous, present, and future information about client buying habits.

Bigger companies see the advantage of buying the software while smaller or medium-sized organizations go for the hosted solution, which is affordable and appropriate for their present circumstance. Once the company grows, companies can always upgrade and get the software. However, if you do not want a third company access to your records, you have the alternative to opt for the purchase of software solutions for your customer relationship management.

With the click of a mouse, you can review a client’s entire account information and right away, you can provide and suggest products, discounts, and company programs that will complement his needs. Much time is saved from looking up one file and another just to consolidate the information. Time is essential when you want to get ahead of competition and make a sale and to recruit new customers.

CRM has gone through tremendous changes. The database concept has leapfrogged to keeping customer loyalty. In this new generation CRM, companies are tracking movements and keeping up with the marketing trends. With the suitable CRM software, you can reap the rewards with an enhanced customer relationship management.

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Top ERP and Enterprise Software Technology Trends for 2014

Posted on August 29, 2017 in Uncategorized

As another year passed, the technology marketplace has been tumultuous in terms of adoption, trends, mergers and acquisitions. Large software players have broadened their portfolios and have started to target customers upstream and downstream from their typical customers. For the new year we have compiled a list of top technology trends – mostly for enterprise software. These trends include ERP, Social business, CRM, BI/EPM/Analytics, Collaboration, Project Failure/Success, Mobile and Security and others are the main areas of focus.

Looking back at the 2013 list of technology trends, most of them have come to pass and are still evolving as adoption continues to grow. Projects continue to fail, spending increases, infrastructures and applications are being remade using the cloud and other IT issues continue to appear and also be resolved.

Here is a list of what we think the top software trends will emerge in 2014.

1. Rise of BI/EPM/Analytic Vendors: This trend has become apparent as many new small start-ups have introduced some type of analytics or BI tool. We have seen very vertical specific solutions to broad all-encompassing software that can be customized by industry. A reason for this trend is that enterprise applications have become easier to integrate and require less technical knowledge to aggregate data out of a system. Organizations are requiring more real-time information, by implementing these systems unlocks the decision-making potential that is stored in the data.

2. Increased Consultant Use: This trend is a 180 from organizations wanting to bring back in-house technical expertise. CIO’s have committed to spending more money on contractors for the upcoming year and software selection is a key component of this spend. Other areas where organizations will spend money in IT and Business alignment are resourcing to support existing projects, project management recovery services have started to push forward as an important area to save failing IT projects to get them back on track. Organizations often do not have the resources or skill sets to properly evaluate enterprise software thereby, more attention will be attributed to lowering project failure. An impartial properly executed software selection greatly lowers the risk of IT failure.

3. ERP’s and Enterprise Software Projects Continue to Fail: Lack of expertise and accountability from both the organization and the vendor lead to failed implementations. There is no clear direction from organizations as to what should be implemented, by whom, what timeframe is acceptable, training, POC, management of scope creep, budgetary overruns, and how problems are resolved should they arise with definitive timelines and accountability. Clear business process definitions are often not revealed by the customer leaving vendors to guess how an organization does business. Organizations should be fully transparent with the vendors they select as they business partners with full two-way communications whereby the vendor can provide a smooth transition after implementation and the organization should also become a reference site for the vendor.

4. Changing IT/Business Selection Criteria: As delivery models continue to change organizations are evaluating different priorities and criteria. Previously organizations have relied too much on features and functions when selecting enterprise software. Many new selection criteria have started to emerge such as: nuances of data, cloud model, portability, scalability, TCO, SLA levels, Vendor lock-in, ROI and agility are areas that more closely scrutinized.

5. Enterprise Software Categories Continue to Merge: The creation of new enterprise software categories continues to emerge. Specialized software vendors have started to include additional functionality that expands the breadth of their solution but often times not the depth that is required. Customers are confused as to how to match the right type of software with what functions and depth they actually require. Vendors have started to include social, collaboration, CRM, project management, billing and BI within their software. This delineation muddies the water for the consumer as they may not know how to categorize their business to match enterprise software categories thereby contacting the wrong vendors to start out their software evaluation.

6. Paying More Attention to BYOD and Security: As use of mobile devices continues to proliferate mobile security and social user policies must be put into place and enforced. Additional security will lower organizational risk by securing multiple mobile devices. Employees should also have direction from the company as to what is acceptable and not for social media interaction, who owns the information, where it stored and clear lines of communication where social accounts differentiate if communications are from the company or an individual user.

7. Increased Spending for Social, CRM and Email Automation: Organizations have committed more IT budget to these softwares. Coincidentally, this is one of the enterprise software categories that are blending functionalities. An organization should comprehend its main business function as to what the organization requires and the auxiliary functionalities. A mistake often made here is that the auxiliary functionalities become the focus which strays the original intent of the software evaluation.

8. Shadow IT Emerges: This is caused by the CMO spending that does not often include the CIO. Usually, the new marketing, social software and BI software is implemented and rarely incorporates into existing IT infrastructure. The new software is independently supported, updated and managed proving difficult for internal IT management and integration to existing systems. Support also becomes a point of contention as the Shadow IT organizations are created as support is often non-coherent and difficult to manage.

9. Vendor Consolidation Continues: More vendors are increasing their portfolios by acquiring either complementary software to bolster existing functionality or even acquiring software that is completely different from current offerings. Organizations should carefully distinguish their needs and if the vendor can support their requirements, if the vendor has enough industry experience or is new to the space altogether are areas for companies to watch out for.

10. New Government and Regulatory Standards: These new requirements will require system upgrades and in some cases new system implementations. ObamaCare, New HIPPA and medical industry requirements will drive software spend in this sector. Also there have been many changes in food processing and manufacturing industries that will cause companies to re-evaluate existing systems or completely installing something new.

11. Salesforce.com Turning into ERP: Salesforce continues to grow its cloud presence by acquiring more SaaS solutions. Its recent acquisitions and cloud portfolio suggests that one of the few plays to increase company value is to increase its offerings. SFDC will acquire solutions that complement their SCRM business with more HR/HCM, Financial and possibly project management which will effectively turn into an ERP for Services. The Oracle partnership suggests that SFDC is targeting Workday customers with Oracle functionality – all to be offered in the cloud. This one should prove interesting to see where this ends up.

12. Further IT Specialization Being Required: New softwares are emerging and requiring specialized expertise. A new software category that enables integration and workflow capabilities are greatly reducing complex IT tasks. However, these new applications often require highly specialized expertise such as programming, business process mapping, API creation, administration, integration and design capabilities that may not have been part of the IT department.

13. Organizations Going Hybrid Cloud: Organizations are adopting a combination of public and private cloud creating hybrid clouds. Organizations are not comfortable putting some types of information in the cloud. They create an internal cloud and have less important information in the public cloud. The cloud provides a seamless integration for employees.

It will fun to see what unfolds this year as with each year. Did we forget any? What trends do you see?

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